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The U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health looked at concussion in school sports, and found that parents are not prepared for their role in reducing kids' risks. __________________________________________________________________

Youth Sports Safety Resources

What do I need to know about kids and sports injuries?
Playing sports is a great way for your child to stay fit and healthy, to learn about teamwork, make friends, and develop a sense of personal satisfaction.  In addition, taking part in youth sports may lead to greater leisure-time physical activity as an adult [1].  

However, kids' injuries from playing sports are on the rise, perhaps due to several factors [2]:

Can youth sports injuries be prevented?
Most sports injuries can be prevented, even predicted! The first step in preventing sports injuries is finding out why sports injuries occur. Sports injuries may be caused by:

More resources:

What do I need to know about trampoline safety?
Trampoline  injuries have been increasing in number and severity. In 2007, hospital emergency rooms treated more than 210,000 kids under age 15 for trampoline injuries.

According to professional medical associations, trampolines should never be used at home, in gym classes, or on the playground. Kids should use trampolines under the supervision of a professional trained in trampoline safety in competitive sports training programs.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) offers these additional safety precautions [3]:

How about the risks for emotional injury in youth sports?baseball coach

A good sports program will provide a safe learning environment where kids can grow physically and emotionally in self confidence. 

However, some kids have negative experiences and sustain real emotional injury.  Find out more in this fact sheet:  Emotional Injuries, from the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation.

Parents have a big role to play. Listen: Parents: Be a Good Sport Too.

What about vitamins, drugs and supplements that are supposed to improve performance?
Here's some information from the American College of Sports Medicine:

What are the risks for specific sports?

In 2008, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported the following statistics on injuries to youth under age 18 [4]:

Where can I get more information about safety in specific sports?

Hockey:

Soccer: soccer players

Cheerleading:

Football:

Gymnastics:

Basketball:

Softball and Baseball

Track and Field

Where can I find out more about sports and safety?

Information:

Listen (American Academy of Pediatrics’ Minute for Kids):

Organizations:

Related topics on YourChild:

 

References

Compiled by Kyla Boyse, RN.  Reviewed by Amy Miller, MD.

Updated August 2009

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U-M Health System Related Sites and Services:
U-M Pediatrics
U-M Bone & Joint Injury Prevention & Rehabilitation Center: Youth Sport Injury Prevention
Family Medicine Sports Medicine Program
U-M MedSport Sports Medicine Program

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