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Urologic Oncology Fellowship in Department of Urology
University of Michigan

The Research Program

The University of Michigan offers outstanding basic science and clinical research opportunities for fellows. The research experience is tailored to the previous experience and future interests of each individual. This personalized approach to research training can be accomplished in 1-2 years based on the specific programs outlined below. Each fellow would select one option to satisfy the research portion of the fellowship.

Program Options:

1. NIH funded Clinical and Translational Research Training Program in Urology (2 year option)

The "Clinical and Translational Research Training Program in Urology" at the University of Michigan is designed to prepare urologists for an independent research career. Fellows are provided with the necessary background in biostatistics, epidemiology and clinical study design, health service research and an opportunity to apply these clinical research skills in a mentored setting. This fellowship is supported by a grant from the NIDDK T32 program. The program requires 2 years of training to acquire the necessary skills for the conduct of high quality clinical and health services research. Coursework leading to a MPH in Epidemiology or a MS in Biostatistics/Clinical Research/Health Services Research are options. Trainees are expected to pursue an academic position.

Since this program is funded by the National Institute of Health, only U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons.

Year One

The trainee will participate in all coursework required by the Rackham Graduate School to obtain a Master’s Degree. The trainee has the opportunity to select one of the following degrees: Master of Public Health in Epidemiology, Master of Science in Clinical Research and Statistical Design, Master of Science in Health Administration or Master of Science in Health Services Research. The concepts and methodology behind clinical and health service research will be taught in detail, and trainees will learn how to solve problems relating to the incidents and outcomes of human disease using specific examples. Emphasis will be placed on understanding various aspects of clinical study designs, analyses and implications for health care. Electives are available and can be selected from the vast offerings within the School of Public Health. Trainees will identify a research mentor and begin to plan their main clinical research project. Together with the mentor, the trainee will design a study protocol following the NIH format for a major clinical research project that will be completed in the second year of this program. Emphasis in this training program will be placed on training in preparation for submitting NIH level grants.

Year Two

By the beginning of year two, the fellow will have acquired many of the skills necessary to carry out a high quality clinical research endeavor, and will be expected to put these skills into practice. He or she will be required to initiate, complete, and report in a peer-reviewed journal an independent clinical research project relevant to Urology. Existing databases in the Department of Urology include benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer detection, radical prostatectomy, bladder cancer, impotence, female and reconstructive urology, and a population-based cohort study of prostate diseases in African American men. These databases exemplify the breadth of clinical research topics from which trainees may choose..

 

2.  Clinical/Health Services Research in Urology (1 year option)

This option is available to those candidates who already have an MPH or comparable degree. Rather than attending course work, they will design at least one high value clinical or health services research endeavor, and will be expected to initiate, complete, and report in a peer-reviewed journal an independent clinical research project relevant to Urology. The Department of Urology houses  several national administrative data repositories as well as several local IRB-approved clinical databases that detail benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer detection, radical prostatectomy, bladder cancer, impotence, female and reconstructive urology, and a population-based cohort study of prostate diseases in African American men. These databases exemplify the breadth of clinical research topics from which trainees may choose.
                                                                                                                                                                                                               

3.  Basic Translational Research in Urology (1 year)

This program, based in an active basic science laboratory, is intended to equip select physicians at the
post-doctoral level with the necessary tools to pursue an independent research career in the field of Urology.  Specifically, at the completion of this 1-year program, trainees will have the skills to: 1) formulate testable hypotheses focused on important questions or problems in genitourinary oncology; 2) develop laboratory-based skills to adequately test these hypotheses, and 3) develop critical thinking skills required to interpret and analyze quantitative laboratory data.  Additional aspects of the program include training in grant-writing techniques and presentation skills for optimal verbal and written communication of research findings. The fellow should also expect to participate in educational opportunities in translational research available through the Michigan institute for Clinical and Health Research.  These include the 5-part series, an “Introduction to Clinical and Health Research for Fellows and Junior Faculty,” the “Introduction to Translational Research” seminar, and workshops in grant writing and statistics. See the attached list of laboratory descriptions for basic science faculty with primary or secondary appointments in urology.

Basic / Translational Laboratories