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Patient Information

Bladder Augmentation with Incontinent Urinary Diversion

Activity:

  1. Gradually increase the amount of walking you do each day. The walking will help you build strength. Short frequent walks of 5 minutes is a good starting point (at least 3-4 times a day).
  2. Take planned rest periods during the day. The best gauge is your own body, and how you feel each day.
  3. Avoid lifting (greater than 5 pounds) or strenuous activity for several weeks. Heavy lifting can cause increased abdominal pressure and put a strain on your incisions. If you need to brace yourself to pick up an object - it is too heavy. 5 pounds = a large telephone book or a gallon of milk.
  4. If you must pick something up bend at your knees not at your waist and stoop to pick the item up.
  5. Stairs may be taken slowly. Waiting to resume sexual activity until your follow-up appointment is recommeded. Your doctor will let you know when you can resume sexual activity.
  6. It is recommended to avoid driving for four weeks or as directed by your doctor.
  7. Driving any motorized machinery or vehicle, signing any legal documents while taking a narcotic pain medication is not recommended. The narcotic medication may cause alterations in visual perception and impair judgement.

Bathing:

  1. You may shower. Gently bathe your incision with antibacterial soap (i.e. dial) and water. Pat dry. This will keep your incision clean, dry and free of germs.
  2. If you have white strips called "steri-strips" on your incision, they should fall off in about seven days. If they fall off, leave them off. After seven days you may peel them off.

Diet:

  1. You may resume your former diet. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking narcotic pain medications.
  2. You may need to drink fluids on a more regular basis to assist in flushing the mucous from your bladder reservoir (The mucous is produced by the piece of bowel that was used for your surgery.)

Special Considerations:

  1. (Males) If your scrotum is swollen, wear supportive briefs (i.e. jockey). When resting, elevate your scrotum on a towel.
  2. You have probably been prescribed Colace (a stool softener) to prevent you from straining when you have a bowel movement. You may take and over-the-counter laxative as needed (i.e. milk of magnesia).
  3. Stoma care of your Urinary Diversion:
    • Wash your hands before and after emptying your stoma bag. Empty the bag when it is ½ to two thirds full to prevent it from disconnecting from the wafer.
    • At night, connect your stoma bag to a drainage bag or night drainage container. During the day, disconnect the drainage bag, rinse it with a solution of equal parts of water and vinegar to prevent growth of bacteria/germs (and decrease odor), and drain the solution into the toilet. Cap the end of the tubing on the bag/container when not in use to keep the end clean.
    • Because a piece of the bowel was used to make your augmentation and urinary diversion, it will produce mucous that you will see in the urine. Drinking plenty of fluids will keep the mucous thin and prevent the mucous from plugging the stoma.
    • Following the instructions for caring for your stoma as instructed by the enterostomal therapist. A home care nurse will visit you in your home to see how you are managing and answer any question.

Call your Doctor if:

  1. Your incision becomes red or swollen.
  2. There is drainage from your incision or your incision opens.
  3. The skin around your stoma becomes red and irritated and does not improve with soap and water cleansing.
  4. The stoma begins to look dark- not a healthy pink.
  5. Your urine becomes bloody or you begin to pass clots.
  6. You have a decrease in the flow of urine from your stoma along with a "full" feeling.
  7. You begin to have nausea and vomiting.
  8. You have severe pain that is not relieved by your pain medication.

Additional Instructions:

If you have any questions or concerns call the Urology Clinic at 734-936-7030 or 734-936-6267 after normal clinic hours or on the weekend and ask for the Urology resident on call.