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Events:

Creating Wellness: An Integrative Approach to Primary Care A UM and MAFP CME Conference

Thursday-Friday, March 29-30, 2012
Kensington Court, Ann Arbor, MI


Headlines

Amy Locke, M.D.

Dr. Locke is the new director of Integrative Family Medicine

The Department is pleased to announce that Amy B. Locke, M.D., assistant professor, as the director of Integrative Family Medicine (IFM).

Taking over from Sara L. Warber, M.D., associate professor, Dr. Locke will oversee the integrative medicine fellowship and medical student/resident educational efforts, work with leadership at Briarwood Family Medicine to maximize the IFM clinical practice, and help promote scholarship in integrative medicine.

Chinese acupuncture affects brain's ability to regulate pain, study shows

Chinese acupuncture affects brain's ability to regulate pain, study shows (8/10/2009)

Researchers at the University of Michigan Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center are first to provide evidence of acupuncture's effect on opoid receptors.

Acupuncture has been used in East-Asian medicine for thousands of years to treat pain, possibly by activating the body’s natural painkillers. But how it works at the cellular level is largely unknown. Read the article

Clinical study reinforces heart benefits of tart cherries (4/28/2009)

Clinical study reinforces heart benefits of tart cherries (4/28/2009)

The antioxidants that give cherries their red color make their way into the bloodstream, a new U-M study shows, and the increased antioxidant activity could be heart healthy. Previous animal studies showed a cherry-enriched diet helped lower blood pressure and body weight. Read the article

Alternative therapies can be safe, effective for children

Alternative therapies can be safe, effective for children (4/6/2009)

Complementary and alternative therapies are becoming more and more popular in the ‘pint-size’ set. A Michigan pediatrician discusses the use of complementary and alternative therapies in children and offers advice on what may be safe and effective and what should be avoided. Read the article

Tart cherries may reduce factors associated with heart disease and diabetes

Tart cherries may reduce factors associated with heart disease and diabetes (4/7/2008)

Inflammation, body fat, weight gain and blood cholesterol all lower in fats fed cherries on top of high-fat, Western-style diet Read the article.