Skip Navigation

Nuclear Medicine: Fellowship

The Department of Radiology at The University of Michigan Hospitals is the primary department responsible for diagnostic imaging at the University's medical center, which includes 865 hospital beds and a large outpatient facility. The range of clinical material available is reflected in the diagnostic patient load of approximately over 500,000 examinations yearly. Inasmuch as The University of Michigan Hospitals is a large tertiary referral center, a very high percentage of cases studied in the radiology department have significant pathology, and the variety of clinical material is outstanding.

The Division of Nuclear Medicine offers two levels of postdoctoral physician training experience directed toward clinical competence: (1) to qualify Radiology Residents for certification in Diagnostic Radiology by the American Board of Radiology (ABR); and (2) to qualify Nuclear Medicine residents (Fellows) for advanced certification in Nuclear Medicine by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM).

Radiology Residents receive their Nuclear Medicine training as a regular rotation during their 4-year residency program in the Department of Radiology. For more advanced training, we offer a one-year or two-year fellowship program (i.e. Nuclear Medicine Residency) directed to ABNM certification. To be eligible for admission to this path, preferred candidates must already have completed residency training in diagnostic radiology, internal medicine, or another clinical care discipline.  The duration of our NM Fellowship training program is one year after completion of a Radiology Residency and two years after completion of a clinical residency program.

Training directed towards Certification by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine

We offer a one-year or two-year training program (Nuclear Medicine residency) directed to ABNM certification. To be eligible for admission to this path, candidates must have successfully completed a clinical residency in an approved training program in Radiology, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Pathology, Neurology, or other relevant specialty. The length of training to become certified by the ABNM is one year after completion of a radiology residency and two years after completion of a clinical residency program.

The principal objective of this clinical training is to prepare physicians to be competent independent practitioners of the full scope of nuclear medicine. The educational program has three parallel requirements: a) satisfactory direct participation in all aspects of clinical patient care, b) satisfactory completion of courses and laboratories in clinical nuclear medicine, physics and instrumentation and radiobiology, and, c) attendance and participation in weekly conferences. Direct participation in clinical patient care is central to the training program. This occurs in the following clinical activities: general nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, pediatric nuclear medicine, a formal clinic that includes direct care of patients with thyroid disease and the therapeutic use of radionuclides, radiopharmacy and camera operations, and clinical PET/CT and SPECT/CT. In addition, the educational program provides opportunities for the development of research skills in both basic and clinical nuclear medicine appropriate for trainees to enter academic and research careers in nuclear medicine.