PREP mentors by Department

 

Anesthesiology

  • Ralph Lydic: Ralph Lydic is the Bert La Du Professor of Anesthesiology and he studies the mechanisms by which sleep, opioids, and volatile anesthetics depress breathing and arousal.

  • Mark Opp: We utilize multiple techniques to determine behavioral effects of neuromodulatory molecules (cytokines, neurotransmitters) in the brain.

Biological Chemistry

  • Ruma Banerjee: Chemical biology of mammalian sulfur metabolism, intercellular redox communication, structural enzymology of vitamin B12 trafficking and human metabolic diseases.

  • Daniel Bochar: Mechanisms of higher eukaryotic gene regulation through the modification of chromatin structure.

  • David Engelke: Spatial organization of nuclear genomes; small RNA biosynthesis and regulation.

  • Bob Fuller: Protein localization and trafficking in the secretory pathway; proteolytic processing.

  • Randal Kaufman: Elucidating fundamental mechanisms that regulate protein folding and cellular responses to accumulation of unfolded protein within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).

  • Tom Kerppola: Our laboratory investigates the roles of protein interactions in transcription regulation using a variety of experimental approaches.

  • Ruthann Nichols: We discovered a human neuropeptide affects cardiovascular function; we are investigating the role of this peptide in disease and its potential for drug development.

  • Patrick O'Brien: Mechanisms of human DNA repair proteins and their importance in genomic stability and the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  • Bruce Palfey: We investigate ensyme reaction mechanisms using biophysical and chemical techniques, with a focus on therapeutically important flavoenzymes.

  • Jochen Schacht: Biochemical and molecular studies of the mammalian auditory system and mechanisms leading to hearing loss.

  • Janet Smith: 3-D structure & function of biosynthetic enzymes.

  • Ray Trievel: Our laboratory is interested in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying chromatin modifications that regulate gene expression and other chromatin-associated functions.

  • David Turner: We study small RNA molecules (microRNAs) that regulate gene expression during the development of the nervous system in mice.

  • Anne Vojtek: Signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, cell death, and neural differentiation.

  • Erik Zuiderweg: NMR methodology has now matured to the point that the systems upto 100 kDa can be studied at atomic level resolution.

Biomedical Engineering

  • Keith Cook: Artificial lungs, liquid ventilation, right ventricular function during lung disease, blood-biomaterial interactions. 

  • Mohamed El-Sayed: We develop innovative therapeutic and imaging agents using sophisticated polymeric carriers that can effectively target the diseased tissues and selectively release the incorporated drug with cellular and sub-cellular accuracy. 

  • Jeff Fessler: Medical image reconstruction algorithms. Image processing. Signal Processing.

  • Jane Huggins: Brain-computer interfaces for people with significant physical impairments. Currently focusing on EEG-based interfaces and issues related to practical clinical utility.

  • Alan Hunt: Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics, Ultrafast laser nanomachining, Biomedical microdevices.

  • Edgar Meyhofer: Cellular and molecular biophycis, laser trapping, TIRFM, single molecule analysis in vivo and in vitro, molecular motors, kinesins, microtubules, DNA mechanics, nanobiotechnology, protein patterning, picowatt calorimetry.

  • Peter Woolf

Biophysics

  • Julie Biteen: Single-molecule and superresolution imaging in live cells. 

  • Alan Hunt: Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics, Ultrafast laser nanomachining, Biomedical microdevices.

  • James Penner-Hahn: We are interested in understanding the distribution and chemical speciation of trace elements in single cells. Our goal is to understand the inorganic physiology of heavy-metal nutrition and toxicology.

Biostatistics

  • Mike Boehnke: Statistical genetics, complex diseases, and human gene mapping, with application to type 2 diabetes and bipolar disorder.

Cardiovascular Center

  • Peter Bodary: The Vascular Biology Laboratory uses mouse models to examine the links between obesity, diabetes and vascular disease.

Cell & Developmental Biology

  • Benjamin Allen: The Allen Lab studies the regulation of Hedgehog signaling during vertebrate embryogenesis using mouse developmental genetics, chick in ovo electroporation, biochemistry, and cell biology.  

  • Richard Altschuler: 1) Stem cells to replace lost auditory nerve; 2) Molecular mechanisms in activity dependent placticity and tinnitus; 3) Cellular mechanisms in age-related hearing loss.

  • Scott Barolo: Research Interests: Gene regulation and signal transduction in development; Structure, function, and evolution of transcriptional enhancers. 

  • Doug Engel: Transcriptional regulation of organ and tissue development.

  • Xing Fan: Studying the molecular mechanism by which brain cancer stem cells self-renew and developing novel therapeutic strategy for brain tumors, including glioma and medulloblastoma 

  • Philip Gage: Cell fate decisions in neural crest and mesoderm; genetic analysis of mammalian eye development; transcription factors; cell signaling pathways.

  • Deborah Gumucio: Intestinal development and disease, from cell signaling to morphogenetic processes. 

  • Peter Hitchcock: My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that govern neurogenesis in the developing brain. 

  • Kristen Verhey: Microtubule-based transport is critical for cell organization and function. We study the mechanisms that regulate the activity, cargo binding and localization of kinesin motors in intracellular transport and primary cilia.

  • Lois Weisman: Our goals are to uncover new, essential subcellular processes and to determine their roles in human physiology. One example is our discovery that defects in the PI3,5P2 signaling pathway result in neurodegeneration.

Cellular & Molecular Biology

  • Gregory Cartee: Effects of exercise, diet (calorie restriction) or aging on regulation of skeletal muscle glucose transport and insulin signaling.

  • Deborah Gumucio: Intestinal development and disease, from cell signaling to morphogenetic processes.

  • Sundeep Kalantry: Our research aims to define the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate X-chromosome inactivation, which results in transcriptional silencing of most genes along one of the two X-chromosomes in female mammals.

  • Catherine Krull: We are interested in the molecules and mechananisms that guide cells to their final destinations during embryonic development. To this end, we have worked on motor axon pathfinding, the specification/migration of neural crest cells and mouse ES cells.

  • Malini Raghavan: Antigen (pathogen) recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, particularly of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, ligands for antigen receptors of cytotoxic T cells. 

  • JoAnn Sekiguchi: My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that maintain genome stability with a focus on DNA repair genes associated with human cancer predisposition and immunodeficiency syndromes. 

  • Xiaochun Yu: The research interests of our laboratory include the mechanisms of DNA damage response, chromatin remodeling, epigenetic modifications, and their roles in tumorigenesis and development. 

Chemical Biology

  • Brent Martin: Our group aims to explore the function and physiological role of novel enzymes and lipids involved in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. To achieve these goals, we bridge chemical, analytical, and biological approaches to identify novel disease targets and develop chemical approaches for therapeutic intervention. Our expertise in cell and molecular biology, chemical probes, mass spectrometry, and imaging technologies presents a unique opportunity for broad training in chemical biology. This multidisciplinary approach will rely on technological innovation focused on unexplored biochemical pathways and their links to human disease.

  • Bruce Palfey: We investigate ensyme reaction mechanisms using biophysical and chemical techniques, with a focus on therapeutically important flavoenzymes.

Chemical Engineering

  • Lola Adefeso: We are using the knowledge of the cellular inflammatory response and blood flow dynamics to design bio-functionalized particles for targeted drug delivery and imaging.

  • Nina Lin

Chemistry

  • Ioan Andricioaei

  • Mark Banaszak Holl: Biomedical nanotechnology: 1) targeted drug delivery 2) mechanism of non-viral gene delivery 3) role of collagen structure in disease.

  • Julie Biteen: Single-molecule and superresolution imaging in live cells. 

  • Brian Coppola

  • Carol Fierke: Catalytic mechanisms and inhibition of metalloenzymes and ribozymes. Cellular metal homeostasis and toxicity using biochemistry, genetics, cell biology and imaging.

  • Nicolai Lehnert: We study nitric oxide reductases (from E. coli, etc.) and corresponding model complexes using vibrational (Raman), EPR, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  • Neil Marsh: 1) Understanding how enzymes use free radicals to catalyze unusual reactions 2) Designing "teflon" proteins using fluorinated amino acids to create better antibiotics. 

  • Adam Matzger: We invent and apply novel methods for the crystallization of small molecules and proteins for applications from structural biology to drug delivery.

  • Nils Walter: The Walter group studies an exciting class of biomolecules of profound biomedical, bioanalytical and nanotechnological promise, non-protein coding RNAs, by state-of-the-art single molecule fluorescence microscopy.

Dermatology

  • James Elder: We use genetics to learn more about psoriasis, a common inflammatory skin disease. We are particularly interested in how the immune system activates the epidermis in psoriasis.

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

  • Trisha Wittkopp: Mechanisms of gene regulation, Development and Evolution.

  • Jianzhi George Zhang: Molecular and genomic evolution.

  • Peter Mancuso: The influence of adipocytokines, hormones produced by fat cells, on the immune response. Currently, we are exploring the role of leptin in bacterial pneumonia and the influence of adipocytokines in cardiovascular and chronic lung disease in human populations. 

Environmental Health Sciences

  • Peter Mancuso: The influence of adipocytokines, hormones produced by fat cells, on the immune response. Currently, we are exploring the role of leptin in bacterial pneumonia and the influence of adipocytokines in cardiovascular and chronic lung disease in human populations. 

Human Genetics

  • Anthony Antonellis: The major focus of our research is to identify and characterize genetic loci responsible for inherited peripheral neuropathies. The end goal of these studies is a better understanding of the function of neurons and glial cells, and the molecular pathology of related diseases. 

  • Dave Burke: Our laboratory studies the interaction between human cellular factors and retroviruses, and their role in oncogenesis and immuity.

  • Margit Burmeister: Identifying genes involved in behavioral, neurological & psychiatric diseases, novel genetic techniques, gene expression, bioinformatics.

  • Julie Douglas: Statistical genetics, genetic epidemiology, cancer genetics.

  • David Ginsburg: The components of the blood-clotting system and how disturbances in their function lead to human bleeding and blood-clotting disorders. 

  • Sundeep Kalantry: Our research aims to define the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate X-chromosome inactivation, which results in transcriptional silencing of most genes along one of the two X-chromosomes in female mammals.

  • David Kohrman

  • Donna Martin: We study the genetic basis of neural development and its relation to disorders of human brain and nervous system development.

  • Miriam Meisler: We are seeking the genetic basis of neurological disorders including epilepsy and ALS. We search for disease mutations in patient DNA, and then develop mouse models in order to understand the pathogenesis and possible therapies.

  • John Moran: We study the impact of transposable elements on the human genome. 

  • Gil Omenn: The student will work on our recently published way to study molecular signatures of cancers, detecting alternatively-spliced proteins (Cancer Resarch 2009;69:300-309) from mass spectrometry datasets.

  • Noah Rosenberg

  • JoAnn Sekiguchi: My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that maintain genome stability with a focus on DNA repair genes associated with human cancer predisposition and immunodeficiency syndromes. 

  • David States: Bioinformatics and systems biology focusing on macrophages and mononuclear phagocytes.

Immunology

  • Keith Bishop: Cellular Immunology, Regulation of T Cell Responses, Cytokines, Costimulation, Tolerance, Transplantation

  • Weiping Zou: Tumor immunopathology and immunotherapy.

  • James Ferrara: We investigate the immunobiology of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A major therapeutic benefit of allogeneic BMT resides in the graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect which is mediated by cytotoxic pathways of cytolytic T cells and natural killer cells. 

  • Phil King: Genetic analysis of signal transduction mechanisms in cells of the immune system.

  • Peter Mancuso: The influence of adipocytokines, hormones produced by fat cells, on the immune response. Currently, we are exploring the role of leptin in bacterial pneumonia and the influence of adipocytokines in cardiovascular and chronic lung disease in human populations. 

  • Malini Raghavan: Antigen (pathogen) recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, particularly of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, ligands for antigen receptors of cytotoxic T cells. 

Internal Medicine

  • Peter Arvan: We focus on the molecular mechanisms of protein folding and trafficking in endocrine cells, and diseases of misfolding and mistargeting.

  • James Baker

  • Charles Burant: Using a systems biology approach, we seek to understand the interaction between genetics and nutrients in the development of disease.

  • David Fox: My lab studies human autoimmmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with a focus on the role of T lymphocytes, especially Th17 cells.

  • Stephen Gruber: Our research focuses on the genetic epidemiology of cancer, specifically concentrating on the identification of low penetrance susceptibility genes for colorectal cancer and environmental factors that modify penetrance.

  • Patrick Hu: The role of insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling in the regulation of development, metabolism, and longevity.

  • Gary Huffnagle

  • Mariana Kaplan: Dr. Kaplan's laboratory focuses primarily on investigating mechanisms of organ damage in systemic autoimmunity, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus.

  • Ron Koenig: Thyroid cancer. Regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone receptors and PPARgamma. Thyroid hormone metabolism in illness.

  • Ivan Maillard: We are interested in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, the biology of Notch signaling and T cell immunology. 

  • David Markovitz: Our laboratory studies the interaction between human cellular factors and retroviruses, and their role in oncogenesis and immuity.

  • Sofia Merajver: Molecular genetics of aggressive breast cancer phenotypes and comparative studies and integrated modeling.

  • Martin Myers: Molecular and neural mechanisms of leptin action on energy balance and metabolism.

  • Marc Peters-Golden: We are interested in regulation of the synthesis and actions of lipid mediators called eicosanoids in inflammation, infection, and fibrosis.

  • JoAnn Sekiguchi: My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that maintain genome stability with a focus on DNA repair genes associated with human cancer predisposition and immunodeficiency syndromes. 

  • Deneen Wellik: Using mouse developmental genetics, my laboratory investigates the function of Hox genes, primarily in the integration of musculoskeletal tissues during development and in the developing kidney.

  • John Williams: We study how diet and hormones participate in regulating the exocrine pancreas to produce an adequate supply of digestive enzymes. 

  • Xiaochun Yu: The research interests of our laboratory include the mechanisms of DNA damage response, chromatin remodeling, epigenetic modifications, and their roles in tumorigenesis and development. 

Kinesiology

  • Susan Brown

  • Gregory Cartee: Effects of exercise, diet (calorie restriction) or aging on regulation of skeletal muscle glucose transport and insulin signaling.

  • Daniel Ferris: We study the biomechanics and neural control of human locomotion. Specific projects examine how humans respond to robotic lower limb exoskeletons and how people activate their brain during walking.

  • Rachael Seidler: Cognitive neuroscience of action, aging, movement disorders, neuroimaging.

  • Riann Smith: Neuromuscular consequences of joint injury relating to arthrogenic muscle inhibition; mechanisms of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

Medicinal Chemistry

  • Garry Dotson: Our lab focuses on the design of novel antimicrobial chemotherapeutics directed against essential biochemical pathways (coenzyme A and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis) in pathogenic bacteria.

  • George Garcia: The research efforts in our lab involve three distinct areas of study: physiological roles of RNA base modification, drug discovery against tuberculosis and drug discovery against Shigella (acute diarrheal disease).

  • Ron Woodard

Microbiology & Immunology

  • Vern Carruthers: The Carruthers lab seeks to understand invasion and survival strategies used by the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

  • Cheong-Hee Chang: Regulation of the effector function of CD4 T cells and dendritic cells.

  • Vic DiRita: Our group studies mechanisms required for host colonization by the intestinal pathogens Vibrio cholerae and Campylobacter jejuni.

  • Wes Dunnick: We study the cis-acting elements that control transcription and recombination of antibody heavy chain genes.  

  • Mike Imperiale: We study the molecular biology of the human virus, BKV, which infects everyone but only causes disease in immunosuppressed individuals.

  • Phil King: Genetic analysis of signal transduction mechanisms in cells of the immune system. 

  • Mary O'Riordan: We study molecular interactions between foodborne bacterial pathogens and their host cells using biochemical, biophysical and genetic methods.

  • Malini Raghavan: Antigen (pathogen) recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, particularly of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, ligands for antigen receptors of cytotoxic T cells. 

  • Lutgarde Raskin: My research and teaching are in the areas environmental biotechnology and microbial ecology. 

  • Kathy Spindler: We study the contributions of viral and host genes to disease caused by mouse adenovirus type 1 (a DNA virus) and Punta Toro virus (an RNA virus).

  • Michele Swanson: We exploit the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila as a tool to study innate immune mechanisms of macrophages and to analyze how metabolic cues coordinate expression of bacterial virulence traits. 

  • Alice Telesnitsky: HIV-1 and other retrovirus mechanisms of genetic variation and the roles of virus and host RNAs in viral replication.

  • Jason Weinberg: We study interactions between adenoviruses and host inflammatory responses. We are interested in viral persistence, host responses to infection, and interactions between the two processes.

  • Christiane Wobus: Human noroviruses cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. We are using murine norovirus as a model to understand how these viruses enter cells and identify targets for antiviral drugs.

  • Chuanwu Xi: We study molecular mechanisms of biofilm development and develop novel approaches for biofilm control. In addition, we also study the spread of antibiotic resistance in the urban water cycle.

Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute

  • Stanley Watson

Molecular & Cellular Pathology

  • Gregory Dressler: My lab utilizes genetic, biochemical, and cell biological approaches to understand development, cell lineage restriction, and complex patterning.   

  • Cory Hogaboam: Our research laboratory addresses two major themes related to chronic pulmonary disease.

  • Celina Kleer: My laboratory is devoted to the discovery and validation of biomarkers of breast cancer prognosis.

  • Andrew Lieberman: We use mouse and cellular models to understand mechanisms of neurodegeneration in inherited neurological diseases. 

  • Nick Lukacs: Innate cytokine responses during viral and allergen-induced pulmonary disease. T cell differentiation, activation and novel transcriptional regulation.

  • Gabriel Nunez: Role of Innate Immunity in Host Defense and Disease.

  • Tom Wilson: DNA double-strand break repair and its relationship to genome stability. Project areas include investigations of basic mechanisms of DNA repair in yeast and examination of the nature of induced genome alterations in human cells.

Molecular & Integrative Physiology

  • Susan Brooks

  • Gregory Cartee: Effects of exercise, diet (calorie restriction) or aging on regulation of skeletal muscle glucose transport and insulin signaling.

  • Christin Carter-Su: Growth hormone signaling and cellular function; JAK-Stat signaling in growth, cancer and metabolism; adapter proteins, diabetes, neuronal survival and differentiation.

  • Daniel Michele: My laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms of cardiac and skeletal muscle disease in inherited muscular dystrophies using gene targeted mouse models.

  • Richard Mortensen: The major goal of my laboratory has been to understand basic mechanisms in the pathophysiology, consequences and treatment of obesity, diabetes and related cardiovascular disease.
      
  • Vasantha Padmanabhan: The focus is to understand the fundamental processes by which environmental / hormonal influences in early fetal life program reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions in adult life and develop prevention and treatment strategies.  

  • Linda Samuelson: Molecular and cellular physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Stomach and intestine stem cells; epithelial cell development and function; growth factors and cellular tansformation.

  • Jessica Schwartz: Regulation of gene expression by growth hormone and related growth factors; signal transduction to the nucleus; mechanisms of insulin resistance; integrative physiology of human growth.

  • Michael Sutton: Molecular control of synapse development and plasticity in the hippocampus and how synaptic defects contribute to human disorders such as autism, mental retardation, and epilepsy. 

  • Michael Wang: We study the molecular basis of inherited stroke and dementia with a focus on CADASIL; we also investigate the molecular and cellular biology of Notch3 signaling.

  • Margaret Westfall: Role of signaling in the modulation of contractile performance under physiological conditions and in during the development of heart failure.

  • John Williams: We study how diet and hormones participate in regulating the exocrine pancreas to produce an adequate supply of digestive enzymes. 

  • Shawn Xu: We study some of the fundamental questions in neuroscience: 1) Neuronal signaling in sensory transduction. 2) Neural circuits and genes controlling behavior and drug addiction.

Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology

  • Gyorgyi Csankovszki: The role of chromatin structure and higher order chromosomal organization in gene regulation and chromosome segregation using C. elegans as a model system

  • Cunming Duan: Research in the Duan lab aims at understanding how peptide growth factors act to control cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis in early development.  

  • Richard Hume: Structure and Function of Neurotransmitter Receptors  

  • Anuj Kumar: My research utilizes genomics, proteomics, and systems biology to study cell signaling and cancer-related pathways.

  • John Kuwada: Genetic and molecular analysis of genes that regulate the function and formation of neural circuits.  

  • Janine Maddock: My laboratory studies (1) the role of ribosome assembly factors and (2) the spatial organization of polar complexes in bacteria.

  • Laura Olsen: We study peroxisomal proteases, dual targeting of proteins within cells, and organelle biogenesis and degradation. We also use proteomics to identify novel peroxisomal proteins.

  • John Schiefelbein: We study the molecular mechanisms regulating cell differentiation in the model plant Arabidopsis using genetics, bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cell biology approaches.

Neuroscience

  • Roger Albin: Basal Ganglia Disease Pathophysiology and Pathogenesis  

  • Wayne Aldridge: We study how individual neurons and neuronal circuits in the basal ganglia contribute and process information in relation to movement and rewards.

  • Xing Fan: Studying the molecular mechanism by which brain cancer stem cells self-renew and developing novel therapeutic strategy for brain tumors, including glioma and medulloblastoma. 

  • Eva Feldman: Dr. Feldman’s laboratory is interested in the role of growth factors in the pathogenesis and treatment of neurologic disorders.

  • John Fink: Our laboratory investigates the causes and treatments of neurologic diseases. We discovered causes of three forms of spinal cord disease (hereditary spastic paraplegia); and one form of dystonia.

  • Peter Hitchcock: My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that govern neurogenesis in the developing brain.

  • Steve Maren: My research interests center on the neurobiology of learning and memory.

Neurosurgery

  • Xing Fan: Studying the molecular mechanism by which brain cancer stem cells self-renew and developing novel therapeutic strategy for brain tumors, including glioma and medulloblastoma. 

Nuclear Engineering & Radiology Sciences

  • Kim Kearfott

Obstetrics & Gynecology

  • Roland Kwok: My research focuses on how protein post-translational modifications, specially acetylation and phosphorylation, alter protein function in cancer cells.

  • Matthew Wishart: i) Regulation of reproductive stem cell proliferation, maturation, and germ cell differentiation by novel protein- and lipid-phosphatases. ii) mouse models of infertility and disease.  

Opthamology & Visual Sciences

  • Peter Hitchcock: Degeneration and death of photoreceptors is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The Hitchcock laboratory investigates the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells in the retina of the zebrafish are able to regenerate photoreceptors.

Otorhinolaryngology

  • Thomas Carey: I have two labs, one is investigating the bais for autoimmune hearing loss and the other is investigating biomarkers in head and neck cancer that predict response to therapy and survival as well as identifying new targets for novel therapy.

  • Keith Duncan: Early stages of sound processing; sensory cell physiology; stem cell replacement strategies; synaptic assembly.

Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases

  • John Barks: Enhancing recovery after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: interventions and mechanisms of action.

  • Vasantha Padmanabhan: The focus is to understand the fundamental processes by which environmental / hormonal influences in early fetal life program reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions in adult life and develop prevention and treatment strategies.  

  • Delia Vazquez: Ongoing research is exploring the neurobiological underpinnings of anxiety found in an animal model that mimics the glucocorticoid protocol schedules given to premature infants treated for lung disease.

Pediatrics-Pulmonary Medicine

  • Marc Hershenson: Our laboratory studies the pathogenesis of chronic airways diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We are particularly interested in how viruses cause exacerbations of these diseases.

Periodontics

  • Renny Franceschi: Research in the Franceschi laboratory is focused on the study of signals regulating the formation and functioning of osteoblasts, cells that produce bone, as well as application of this knowledge to regenerate mineralized tissues for eventual clinical use.

  • Yvonne Kapila

Pharmacology

  • Margaret Gnegy: Mechanism of action of amphetamine at the dopamine transporter; substrate and protein kinase effects on transporter trafficking; nicotine potentiation of amphetamine activity. 

  • Paul Hollenberg: We are studying the relationship between the structure and catalytic mechanisms of the human cytochromes P450 that are involved in the metabolism of drugs.

  • Lori Isom: Our research focuses on the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in human development and disease, with particular emphasis on epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and multiple sclerosis. 

  • Jeff Martens: Cardiovascular and Sensory Neuropharmacology.

  • Rick Neubig: Research in the Neubig Lab focuses on mechanisms of signal transduction through GTP binding proteins (G proteins) and the receptors which activate them.

  • Gabby Rudenko: Synaptic protein networks and molecules implicated in neuro-psychiatric diseases. 

  • John Tesmer: The Tesmer lab studies the structure and function of intracellular proteins that initiate signal transduction cascades in response to extracellular stimuli.

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

  • Steve Britton: Evolutionary basis of disease as approached from thermodynamics.

Psychiatry

  • Patricia Deldin: Our lab does research on mental illness (schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder) using psychophysiological and behavioral methods.  
  • Robert Thompson: We are interested in the roles of microRNAs (small RNAs) implicated in the brain’s response to stress, psychiatric disease and medications and drugs of abuse. 

Psycholinguistics

  • Julie Boland: How do we understand language in real time, coping with ambiguity?

Psychology

  • Wayne Aldridge: We study how individual neurons and neuronal circuits in the basal ganglia contribute and process information in relation to movement and rewards.

  • Joshua Berke: Neurophysiology of learning and decision-making, and how these go awry in human disorders such as drug addiction and Parkinson's disease.

  • Patricia Deldin: Our lab does research on mental illness (schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder) using psychophysiological and behavioral methods.

  • Sara Konrath: Researchers in my lab explore hormonal and other psychophysiological consequences of helping behavior and aggression, and their correlates (e.g. empathy and narcissism). 

  • Ioulia Kovelman: Language and literacy acquisition in children and adults, bilingualism, dyslexia, brain imaging (fMRI) of language and reading development.

  • Cindy Lustig: We study memory and attention, particularly in older adults, using a variety of methods.

Radiology

  • Paul Carson: Diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound emphasizing acoustic vaporization of perfluorocarbon microdroplets, photoacoustic and microwave tomography, x-ray/ultrasound/optical breast imaging; system development and laboratory and clinical evaluation.  

  • Kimberlee Kearfott

Surgery

  • Keith Cook: Artificial lungs, liquid ventilation, right ventricular function during lung disease, blood-biomaterial interactions.