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Comprehensive Epilepsy Program

The following faculty participate in diverse epilepsy research efforts ranging from individual clinical projects to nationally funded clinical and basic science trials:

Co-directors: Jack Parent, M.D. and Linda Selwa, M.D.

Faculty: Simon Glynn, M.D., Temenuzhka Mihaylova, M.D., Ph.D., Daniela N. Minecan, M.D., Gail Fromes, M.S., A.P.R.N., B.C., C.N.P., William Stacey, M.D., Ph.D.

The epilepsy faculty participates in diverse research efforts ranging from individual clinical projects to nationally-funded multicenter clinical trials and basic science studies.  The University of Michigan is a site for the multicenter Epilepsy Phenome-Genome Project, a National Institutes of Health funded research study to identify genes that influence the development of certain types of epilepsy. Active research collaborations with other departments or programs include interdisciplinary studies with Bioengineering, the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, Neuroradiology (including functional and structural MRI, PET and SPECT studies), Neurosurgery, Physics, Psychiatry and Psychology. Ongoing research investigations include:

  • Experimental anti-epileptic drug trials
  • Basic science studies of experimental temporal lobe epilepsy
  • Electrophysiological and morphological studies of surgically resected epileptic human hippocampus
  • The effects of sleep apnea treatment on epilepsy
  • Vagal nerve stimulation in children and adults
  • Non-linear EEG analysis to predict seizure onsets
  • fMRI localization of language and memory function in intractable epilepsy patients
  • Coping strategies and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures
  • Psychosocial and disability determinants in epilepsy

Please visit the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program website for more information on the clinical epilepsy program, or the Neurodevelopment and Regeneration Laboratory website
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~parent/NeuralHome.html for additional information on translational epilepsy research.