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Protein Localization, Identification and Folding Core

In Vivo Animal and Human Studies Core
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Molecular Biology Core

Microbiome and Metabolomics Core

In Vivo Animal and Human Studies Core

Overview:

1. Small Animal Studies Program
Most of the small animal facilities are located on the 6th floor of Medical Science Research Building I (MSRBI) and include facilities for:

  1. In vivo and ex vivo electrophysiological studies and in vivo electroporation (Rm 6522)
  2. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis (Rm 6504)
  3. Animal function studies laboratory (Rm 6521)

Equipment for In vivo single fiber recording and for electroporation for siRNA transfer into targeted tissues are in 6504 MSRB. The Accuri C6 flow cytometer used for FACS analysis is in 6504 MSRBI.

In vivo cellular and molecular imaging studies in small animals are performed by the Michigan Center for Molecular Imaging Resource of the Dept. of Radiology in the Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) across the street from MSRBI, where most GI labs are located. This includes bioluminescence imaging, micropositron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography and functional magnetic resonance for small animal studies. For detailed descriptions of these equipments, see Facilities page of the In Vivo Studies Core.


The mice endoscopy lab is housed in Dr. Wang’s lab in BSRB. The Medical School and Dept. of Medicine gave >$500,000 to developing the animal endoscopy laboratory which has state-of-the-art instruments like an endoscopic laser confocal fluorescent microscope miniaturized for use in rodents. This permits microscopic mucosal imaging during endoscopy, giving a similar view of what pathologists see with biopsy specimens, and has been referred to as “virtual histology”.  Another piece of equipment is the Cellvizio® confocal imaging system (Mauna Kei Technologies, Paris, France) which is uses a fiber optic bundle coupled to a tiny lens.
For feeding behavior studies, facilities for measuring food intake and other metabolic studies are housed in the Dept. of Physiology Rm 7615, Medical Sciences II Building near the small animals housing space. To measure food intake, a Stoeiting Basile Feeding and Drinking Monitor System will be used, which includes activity monitors.  This facility is directed by Dr. Liangyou Rui, a member of the UMCGR.

2. Organoid and Enteroid Modeling Program

The organoid/enteroid program is located in Drs. Spence’s and Samuelson’s labs in close proximity on the 2nd floor of BSRB on the main Medical campus.  Adjacent to the main Spence lab is the 200 square foot tissue culture room which is equipped with equipment to conduct experiments, including 3 laminar flow hoods, 4 water-jacketed tissue culture incubators and 2 Labconco 4 ft semi-sterile hoods to manipulate organoid and enteroids. Refrigerators (4°C, -20°C, -80°C), centrifuges, and water baths are dedicated to the tissue culture space.  In 2013, the GI Division invested $100,000 in the Organoid/Enteroid core to purchase dedicated equipment including a laminar flow hood, Labconco semi-sterile hood, 2 water-jacketed TC incubators, and cold storage (-20°C, -80°C) and hire necessary personnel.

3. Biospecimen Banking Service
Sample acquisition will occur at 2 sites depending on their source. Resected surgical specimens will be processed in accordance with established SOPs by the department of Pathology and samples will be collected through UM Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Tissue Procurement Core (UMCCC TPC) supervised by Dr. Giordano. Biopsy specimens will be obtained from the endoscopy suite in the Medical Procedure Unit (MPU) of University Hospital. Repositories for long-term storage of biosamples will be managed through CLASS Laboratory, a national research reference lab at University of Michigan (http://www.class.sph.umich.edu/).

4. Clinical Study Design and Statistics Program (CSDS)
 The CSDS Study Coordinator and Statistician have ~250 square feet of office space next to Dr. Higgins’s office MSRB I. They have access to locking file cabinets and necessary supplies and equipment.  Conference rooms are next to the lab space for meetings with Center members and their teams. The Statistician and Study Coordinator have password protected personal computers and printer access. The Statistician has secure password-protected access to a physical server (see Equipment) on which statistical analyses will be performed.  A dedicated server has been provided by Departmental seed funding to store data sets (OptumInsight, 2002-2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), State Inpatient Datasets (SID) with confidential patient identifiers, and Truven Health datasets) for analysis by Center members for epidemiologic studies. The server also has current versions of SAS, Stata, and R to facilitate rapid batch computing of large models. These are augmented with other tools such as SUDAAN, Matlab, BUGS, Genehunter, and SAGE.

 

Facilities and Equipment for each Program

Please be sure to submit this core services request form and submit to the appropriate Core Director to be eligible to receive the subsidies.

1. Small Animal Studies Program

Animal Operating Facilities
Two well-equipped animal operating rooms are located on the lower level in the Medical Science Research Building II, under the direct supervision of the Department of Surgery.  Immediately attached to the animal operating rooms are full facilities for anesthetic induction and recovery.  All necessary anesthetic and surgical personnel and all equipment needed for the proposed chronic animal preparation including instrumentation, anesthetic equipment and equipment necessary for smooth recovery are available in this facility.

The mouse surgical laboratory is located near animal housing space in Rm. 7610 Medical Science II Building.  A microscopic surgical workstation is equipped with a Leica Stereo Zoom dissecting microscope, an external homeothermic blanket with a temperature monitoring rectal probe providing feedback to a proportional electronic controller to control body temperature, and a programmed syringe pump to perfuse physiologic solutions into other gastrointestinal tract or to withdraw gastrointestinal juices.

Experimental Facilities
In direct proximity to the operating room and the long-term animal housing facility, is the large animal physiological laboratory.  This area comprises of 600 square feet and is equipped with a Pavlov stand and a full range of common-use experimental equipment.  This site, also under the supervision of the Department of Surgery, will be open to all Investigators in the Center for large animal in vivo experimentation.

Developmental Endoscopy Animal Laboratory
The laboratory is located on the first floor of Medical Science Research Building I, occupying more than 500 sq. ft. of wet laboratory space. It is equipped with regular gastroscopes and colonoscopies reserved for endoscopy work in dogs and pigs. It also has miniature endoscopes used in rodent research. There are 2 operating tables for large animal endoscopy research and a separate are for device modification and development. Recently it acquired a new endoscopic laser confocal fluorescent microscope that is miniaturized to be used in rodents. It also has a CellviZio® confocal imaging system (Mauna Kei Technologies, Paris, France). This laboratory, developed by the Division of Gastroenterology in collaboration with the UMCGR, is entirely devoted for endoscopy development and research.

Mouse Facilities for Feeding Studies
For feeding behavior studies, facilities for measurement of food intake and other metabolic studies are housed in the Center for Integrative Genomics in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology in Rm. 7615, Medical Science II Building near the small animal housing space.  For measurement of food intake, a Stoeiting Basile Feeding and Drinking Monitor System will be used.  This system includes 6 individual mouse cages, each of which allows the monitoring of food and water consumption directly linked to the computer.  The food trough water bottles are each attached to strain gauge transducers to measure small changes in weight with consumption.  The design includes the recovery of unconsumed crumbs of food or spilled drops of water.  The system also includes activity monitors with two arrays of infrared emitters and detectors to record horizontal activity (locomotion) as well as vertical activity (rearing) to monitor movement. This facility is under the direction of Dr. Liangyou Rui, a member of UMCGR.  

Facilities for In Vivo and Ex Vivo Electrophysiology Studies and In Vivo Electroporation
This electrophysiology laboratory is located within the H. Marvin Pollard Institute for Medical Research (MSRB I, 6th Floor). It is equipped with a recording rig with Nikon inverted microscope with Hoffman optics, fluorescent light source, Gould 420 oscilloscope with 20MHZ digital storage, WPI 121 window discriminator, high performance AC amplifier, AM system 1600 neuroprobe amplifier and A-D data acquisition system Axon 16 bit data 1322A and Kopf 1730 intracellular sterotaxic frame with 3 electrode manipulators.

The same location also houses equipment for electrophysiology recording of isolated gastric vagal afferent fiber using the in vitro vagus-stomach preparation.  These include a DAM-6x100 pre-amplifier, digital storage oscilloscope, digital tape recorder, PC computer equipped with an A/D board and acquisition module of waveform impulse analysis software and a sylgard-coated organbath. In addition, all the equipment used for electroporation for direct transfer of siRNA into targeted neurotissues or GI organs are also available in this facility.

Fluorescence-activated Cell Sorting Analysis
The In Vivo Animal and Human Studies Core provides UMCGR member investigators with access to an Accuri C6 flow cytometer which is housed on a 150 square ft. bench top in 6504 MSRB I. The Accuri C6 flow cytometer is a high performance analytic cytometer that matches the functionality of the bestselling analytical flow cytometers. Features of the C6 include: 1. Two laser excitation: a) 488nm diode laser: excites FITC, GFP, PE, PerCP, PerCp-Cy 5.5 & PI and b) 640nm diode laser: excites APC. 2. Two scattered light detectors: a) Forward scatter (FSC) and b) Side scatter (SSC) 3. Four fluorescent emission detectors: a) FL1 530+/-15nm (FITC/GFP); b) FL2 585+/-20nm (PE/PI); c) FL3 >670nm (PerCP-Cy5.5, PE-Cy5, PE-Cy7); and d) FL4 675+/-12.5nm (APC). Accuri C6 Cytometers allow simultaneous labeling with 4 different antibodies if needed, which significantly reduce the amount of samples needed and time required to generate data.

In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Studies in Small Animals
The In Vivo Studies Core also has the capability to perform in vivo cellular and molecular imaging studies in small animals.  This service is provided through the Michigan Center for Molecular Imaging Resource of the Department of Radiology and is housed in the Biomedical Science Research Building, situated across the street from MSRB I, where most of the GI laboratories are located.  This includes bioluminescence imaging, micropositron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography and functional magnetic resonance for small animal studies. The services provided by this program include: bioluminescence imaging, micropositron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography and functional magnetic resonance for small animal studies.

Laboratory:

CMI
The Center for Molecular Imaging, which was established in 2001 at the University of Michigan, is a shared resource aimed at providing state of the art imaging services for cancer researchers.  The CMI currently has two locations, one at the Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) and one at the North Campus Research Complex (NCRC).  The BSRB CMI is a small animal imaging facility and houses a diverse range of imaging systems including an Agilent horizontal bore MRI systems (7 Tesla), two in vivo optical IVIS bioluminescent/fluorescent imaging systems, a Siemens Inveon PET/CT system, a TriFoil Imaging SPECT/CT system and a  Bruker CT imaging system.  The NCRC CMI offers an in vivo IVIS Spectrum optical imaging system capable of bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging as well as dedicated analysis space, animal procedure space and animal housing.  The NCRC CMI also offers an Agilent 4.7 Tesla MRI system that is capable of medium-to-large animal imaging.  This MRI area is equipped with a large animal anesthesia system and an associated pulse oximeter for monitoring. The CMI has become a central, diverse and dynamic resource facility wherein exchange of techniques and ideas can occur, fostering productive interdisciplinary collaborations in research

Major Equipment:

MRI/S
The small animal 7T/31 cm horizontal bore Agilent MR spectrometer/imager is located on level D of the BSRB and the medium-to-large animal 4.7T/60 cm horizontal bore Agilent MR spectrometer/imager is located in Building 23 at NCRC.  The 7T system has an Oxford actively shielded gradient coil at 40 Gauss/cm nominal amplitude.  The 4.7T system has an actively shielded gradient coil at 6.8 Gauss/cm nominal amplitude.  Both of these systems have high-resolution phase shifters on both observe and decoupler rf channels, Oscilloscopes and sweep generators are also located at both locations to facilitate tuning of MR probes and trouble-shoot instrument problems.  Both facilities also have a variety of imaging coils suitable for a variety of animal sizes and imaging interests.

Both the BSRB and NCRC facilities have additional procedure and animal holding space adjacent to the MR rooms.  Anesthesia equipment and animal temperature regulation is available for both small and large animals and when required included a MR conditional rebreathing isoflurane vaporizer equipped with CO2 absorber and a mobile cart.  The CMI also provides for monitoring during medium-to-large animal imaging with a Nonin fiber optic pulse oximeter.   

PET/CT
The Siemens Inveon is a preclinical imaging platform that provides integrated small animal PET/CT imaging and analysis.  PET imaging is achieved via a dual-rotating 57Co transmission source with an axial FOV of 12/7 cm and continuous bed motion that effectively extends the axial FOV to 50 cm.  CT imaging utilizes an 80 W tungsten anode with a maximum resolution of 27 microns.  The system is equipped with an inhalable anesthesia system and a heated bed is utilized to maintain constant body temperature.  Animal preparation area and recovery areas are available. 

SPECT/CT
A TriFoil Imaging eXplore speCZT SPECT/CT small animal imaging system is available to all investigators.  This is a high-performance system with a full ring detector consisting of 10 heads and CT-based attenuation correction. A dedicated gas anesthesia system is available as well as a heated bed to maintain body temperature during imaging.  Animal preparation area and recovery areas are available.  
 
CT
A Bruker SkyScan is available for small animal use.  The large format 11 megapixel x-ray camera gives an unrivalled combination of resolution, image field size and scan speed.  An integrated physiological monitoring subsystem provides breathing and heart-beat gating for proven thoracic image improvement by synchronized acquisition.  A dedicated gas anesthesia system is available as well as a heated bed to maintain body temperature during imaging.  Animal preparation area and recovery areas are available.  
      
Bioluminescence/Fluorescence

The BSRB CMI has two IVIS imaging systems and the NCRC CMI has one IVIS imaging system.  Each system is capable of bioluminescence imaging and each has a dedicated small animal inhalation anesthesia system and heated stages which enable imaging of five mice simultaneously.  The IVIS Spectrum systems have the additional capability of fluorescence imaging.  Animal preparation and recovery areas are available are available at both locations and for each unit individually.

 

2. Organoid and Enteroid Program

The Organoid and Enteroid program will be primarily situated in Dr. Jason Spence’s laboratory which is located in the Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB).

Laboratory
The lab occupies 660 sq. feet of wet lab space, located near the PI office. The lab is an open design. Members of the laboratory will have access to all of the equipment, reagents and technical support necessary to complete the proposed experiments. This includes chemical hoods, bench sinks, electrophoresis equipment, microcentrifuges, water baths, rotating hybridization ovens, platform and orbital shakers, balances, refrigerators, freezers (-20 and –80) etc. There are also additional procedure rooms for microscope use (lab microscopes include an Olympus IX71 fluorescent inverted microscope and an Olympus SZX16 fluorescent stereomicroscope), warm room, heavy equipment space, darkroom facilities and X ray processor, autoclave, and dishwashing facilities. The Spence lab also houses a Step-One Plus quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR).

Adjacent to the main Spence lab area is a 200 square foot tissue culture room, and a 200 square foot “auxiliary room”. The tissue culture room is equipped with all of the equipment to carry out experiments, including three laminar flow hoods, four water-jacketed tissue culture incubators and two Labconco 4ft semi-sterile hoods to culture enteroids and organoids. The Auxiliary room houses stereomicroscopes and dedicated bench space for procedures such as processing tissue samples. Additional refrigerators (4C, -20C), centrifuges and water baths are dedicated to the tissue culture space.

Computers
The lab is equipped with two Dell Precision Workstation T3500, which include 3.20GHz Six Core Zeon processors, 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 SDRAM ECC, 1.0GB NVIDIA Quadro 2000 Dual Mon 2DP & 1 DVI, 2X160GB SATA 10K RPM Hard Drives, DVD Drive 16X DVDRW SATA Data Only and 20” widescreen monitors. The lab also has five 27” 2.7GHz Quad-core Intel Core i5 iMac Computers. Three additional computers (Dell 780MT Optiplex Mini Towers) are connected to the microscopes and QPCR machines and available as workstations when the microscopes are not in use.

Office
Dr. Spence occupies 150 sq. ft. of office space. The office is equipped with desk, filing cabinets, built-in book shelves, table and chairs for informal meetings, Macbook pro computer with two 27” monitors, printer and telephone.  In addition, Dr. Spence has access to a shared photocopier, fax machine and scanner. Administrative support is provided through the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology.

Environment
The primary performance site for the Spence Lab and the Organoid/Enteroid core is the 2nd floor of Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB). The Spence lab is situated in a large open-lab format that facilitates sharing of equipment and reagents, frequent interaction, and the free-flow of ideas. Secondary performance sites include Medical Sciences Research Building (MSRB) and North Campus Research Complex (NCRC). Both MSRB and NCRC are conveniently located in close proximity to BSRB. Specifically, BSRB and MSRB are across the street from one-another on the main Medical Campus at the University of Michigan. NCRC is located approximately two miles from BSRB, but a central shuttle runs between the two campuses (door-to-door) every 10 minutes.

3. Clinical Study Design and Statistics Program

Office Space
The UMCGR Clinical Study Design and Statistics (CSDS) Program Study Coordinator and Statistician have approximately 150 square foot of office space adjacent to Dr. Higgins’ office which is located on the 6th floor of MSRB I. They have access to locking file cabinets and the necessary office supplies and equipment. Conference rooms are located adjacent to the laboratory space where meetings with UMCGR members and their teams take place.

Computers
The Statistician and Study Coordinator each have password protected personal computers and access to a printer. The Statistician has secure password-protected access to the physical server (see Equipment) on which statistical analyses will be performed.

Equipment
A dedicated physical server has been provided by Departmental seed funding which stores datasets for use and analysis by UMCGR Members for epidemiologic studies, which currently includes OptumInsight datasets, 2002-2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) datasets, State Inpatient Datasets (SID) with confidential patient identifiers, and Truven Health data. This server also has current versions of SAS, Stata, and R to facilitate rapid batch computing of large models on the server itself.

Institutional Resources
The UMCGR Clinical Study Design and Statistics (CSDS) Program will use several resources available through the Department of Statistics, the Institute of Social Research, and the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

Department of Statistics. The University of Michigan, Department of Statistics includes faculty who are renowned researchers who work on some of the most important problems of the day, including modeling and analyzing complex and high-dimensional data. Among them are a MacArthur Fellow (Susan Murphy), the current president of the International Statistical Institute (Vijay Nair), editors of leading statistics journals (Xuming He, George Michailidis and Naisyin Wang), and elected fellows of the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. The faculty in the Department of Statistics has made significant contributions to the R software base, including many of the packages used for machine learning and adaptive trial design. The Department of Statistics offers consultative services through CSCAR, the Center for Statistical Consultation and Research.

Institute for Social Research. The ISR was founded in 1949, and pioneered the Likert Scale, the modern survey sampling methods the resulted in the only correct prediction of the 1948 presidential election, and the clinical trial methodology used to run the Salk polio trial in 1954.  ISR is the world’s largest academic social science survey and research organization. The ISR conducts some of the most widely cited and influential surveys in the world. The faculty of ISR develop and applying new survey and data analysis methods. In addition to traditional survey and statistical work, the ISR has recently received an $11 million NIH grant to develop innovative tools to gather, analyze and interpret health data generated by mobile and wearable sensors, which has generated interest from a number of UMCGR members.

Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. The IHPI was founded in 2011, and has 400 members at the University of Michigan North Campus Research Center dedicated to studying healthcare in large datasets, identifying ways to deliver better care and value, and testing and implementing innovations to improve healthcare. The IHPI Data and Methods Hub provides access to large national healthcare datasets and support for querying and analyzing these data to answer healthcare questions. The IHPI Impact Accelerator provides assistance to faculty seeking to test and implement changes in health care.

Statistical Analysis Tools. The primary data analysis tools in the Division are SAS, Stata, and R. These are augmented with other tools such as SUDAAN, Matlab, BUGS, and statistical genetics packages such as Solar, Genehunter, and SAGE. Familiarity with these packages, particularly the first three, is extensive. More than 10 GI Division faculty, including Dr. Higgins, have Master’s degrees in Statistics.

4. Biospecimen Banking Service

The Biospecimen Banking Service will have 2 components: i) Tissue Procurement and ii) Biofluid Procurement. We are extremely fortunate to have access to a world-class facility dedicated to the receiving, storing and distribution of biofluids. The Biospecimen Banking Service will make full use of the CLASS lab for all of its biofluid needs. This laboratory also serves as the biorepository and meets the Center’s needs for sample management. Over the past 15 years, the CLASS lab has managed over 750,000 samples and manufactured and shipped over 50,000 kits. Over the last several years, the Division of Gastroenterology Biorepository Program has maintained a large amount of clinical and pathology data related to inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatic cancer, viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, gastric and colon cancer. This service is critical for supporting our translational GI research mission. We believe the In Vivo Animal and Human Studies Core has all of the requested expertise, state-of-the-art equipment, and IT resources to provide high quality biospecimens, associated clinical data and personnel support to enhance translational research in gastrointestinal disorders.

The Biospecimen Banking Service within the In Vivo Animal and Human Studies Core has 2 separate units:

Tissue Procurement Component
The Tissue Procurement Component is housed in the laboratory of Dr. Thomas Giordano (letter of commitment attached). Dr. Giordano, as a Professor in the Department of Pathology and the Director of the UMCCC Tissue Procurement Core, has a laboratory in Medical Science Research Building 2 that performs all types of molecular pathology studies. The laboratory is composed of a laboratory with adjacent equipment space and nearby office space, totaling approximately 1500 square feet. Dr. Giordano has office space in Medical Science Research Building 2, room C570D.

The Giordano laboratory is outfitted with all of the necessary equipment for molecular pathology studies, including centrifuges, microfuges, several PCR machines including a Cepheid Smartcycler Q-PCR machine and facilities for electrophoresis. Facilities and equipment needed for constructing tissue arrays are available.
A Dako Autostainer for immunohistochemical analysis of slides and an Olympus BX40 microscope for image capture and analysis is also available. Among the individual pieces of equipment are an Olympus BX-51 fluorescence microscope with dedicated Dell Optiplex computer, standard transmitted light BX-40 Olympus microscope, several Dako Autostainers, a Ventana Discovery HistoRx PM2000 for AQUA analysis, and an Acturus PicCell II LCM instrument. Facilities for Hematoxylin and Eosin staining are also available, including microwave ovens, 4 heating blocks, 6 power supplies and equipment for DNA, RNA and protein electrophoresis, three balances, pH meter, several PCR machines (PTC-100 Programmable from MJ Research, Inc.). Cepheid Smartcycler Q-PCR machine. Several water baths, 3 refrigerators, 3 –20°C freezers, –80°C freezer with backup systems, and gel dryer make up the rest of the equipment needed for the services available to GI SPORE investigators.

Biofluid Component
The biofluid component is housed in laboratory of Dr. Dean Brenner (GI SPORE PI) (letter of commitment attached). The laboratory is located in the Cancer Center, easily accessible from the clinics and procedure units. The 1800 square foot space has additional equipment storage space and an adjacent cold room.

Sample processing Laboratory:
The laboratory in the Cancer Center, is 1800 sq. ft. in size and serves as a resource for biomarker and cancer chemoprevention research. The laboratory has 4 large -80°C freezers, one -20 degree freezer and one refrigerator, 3 refrigerated centrifuges, Ethernet linked computers, bar code readers, and necessary supplies to manage human samples. The laboratory is equipped with two Prominence® HPLC (Shimadzu Corp.) equipped with EZStart software, Prominence UV-Vis detector and a photodiode array detector, three Waters HPLC systems (600E controllers, two Waters 715 automated injector, a Waters 712 automated injector, Waters 484 and 490 UV Detectors; Waters Diode array detector; Beckman Radioflow detector, Waters 470 fluorescence detector, Millennium chromatographic software); an ESA 4-channel electrochemical detector; a Hewlett-Packard spectrophotometer with HPLC flow cell, kinetics capability; a Perkin-Elmer LS30 fluorimeter; a Buchi RE111 rotary evaporator; a Savant Speed-Vac; a Perkin Elmer thermocycler; a Beckman plate reader; balances; incubators;; and gel electrophoresis equipment. A separate cell culture room is equipped with a biological safety cabinet, Thermo cell culture incubator, and an Olympus CKX41 inverted microscope with a SPOT digital camera and fluorescence and dark field imaging. This lab receives dry ice shipments once a week and has liquid nitrogen available at all times for tissue preservation.

Sample Storage Facility: Clinical Ligand Service Satellite (CLASS)
Laboratory facilities in partial support of this effort are located in the CLASS laboratory, a 3000 sq. ft. facility remote from the main University Campus at 1919 Green Road, Ann Arbor Michigan. This space includes a 2000 square foot freezer farm. The laboratory was created to meet the needs of a large reproductive sciences research program serum hormone research project. This Laboratory also serves as a biorepository and meets the UMCGR’s needs for sample management. Over the past 15 years, the Laboratory has managed over 1,000,000 samples and manufactured and shipped over 30,000 kits.

The CLASS Laboratory contains all equipment to manufacture kits; ship kits and samples; receive samples; log-in samples; store samples in known row, column, box, rack, freezer locations; retrieve samples; fast thaw samples; run assays on five ACS:180 automated immunoassay analyzers; log raw data from the analyzers; analyze the data offline; assess validity of assay results; re-freeze samples rapidly; return samples to their established locations; transfer encrypted data over Ethernet and fiber optic links; store data in a central SQL database (at RSP); format results into a form for electronic transfer to the Coordinating Center; and transfer data by any of several means including PGP encrypted e-mail attachments and FTP servers. The laboratory is equipped with suitable benches and sinks, special air conditioning equipment to maintain constant (within 3°C) temperatures all year, equipment producing reagent grade type II water, large numbers of heavy duty power outlets, and computer connections to the University's Ethernet backbone and thence to other laboratories, the University and the Internet. The -80°C chest freezers are located in a 2000 sq. ft. facility custom renovated for secure, long-term sample storage. Integrity of the freezer facility is supported by: a permanently installed high capacity (220V 3-Phase) automatic electric generator backup unit; two independent sets of temperature probes monitoring each freezer (one built into individual Revco units and the other separately wired units of RSP's Gordinier Model 3200 monitoring system); independent alarm systems at both the freezer and monitoring unit levels, a dedicated dial-out system for the Gordinier 3200, a dedicated, uninterruptible power supply supported, computer system monitoring both sets of probes and the Gordinier 3200 monitoring unit itself; and, a Web-based reporting server providing remote on-line monitoring of individual freezer status from anywhere in the world. More information regarding the capabilities, resources, and structure of this facility can be seen at
http://swan.class.sph.umich.edu/.

Please be sure to submit this core services request form and submit to the appropriate Core Director to be eligible to receive the subsidies.

 

 

 

 

 

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