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Movement Disorders Group Faculty

     
William T. Dauer, M.D., Director of the University of Michigan Movement Disorders Group, is the Elinor Levine Professor of Neurology and Associate Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology. A graduate of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Dr. Dauer subsequently pursued a neurology residency and subspecialty training in movement disorders at Columbia University. He is a board certified neurologist who cares for patients with all types of movement disorders, including Parkinson disease, dystonias, tremors, tics and related disorders. Dr. Dauer’s main research interests are the pathogenesis of dystonia and mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease and related disorders. His accomplishments have been recognized by several distinctions, including election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation; the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation Fahn Award for excellence in dystonia research and Columbia University’s Harold and Golden Lamport Award for excellence in clinical science research.
  Dauer
     
Roger L. Albin, M.D., Associate Director for Research of the University of Michigan Movement Disorders Group, is the Anne B. Young Collegiate Professor of Neurology, Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Neurology, and Chief of Neuroscience Research at the VA Ann Arbor Health System Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center. Dr. Albin attended medical school at the University of Pittsburgh and received his Neurology training at the University of Michigan. He subsequently did fellowship training in movement disorders and research training at Michigan. Dr. Albin’s primary research interest is understanding the brain changes underlying important clinical features of movement disorders and dementias. Brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and MRI scanning are the primary methods used in his research. Dr. Albin is a board certified neurologist whose clinical practice includes both movement disorders and cognitive disorders patients. He is particularly experienced in the management of Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, and Lewy body dementia.
  Albin
     
Kelvin L. Chou, M.D., Associate Director for Clinical Activities of the University of Michigan Movement Disorders Group, is the Thomas H. and Susan C. Brown Early Career Professor in the Department of Neurology. Dr. Chou also serves as Co-Director of the Surgical Therapies Improving Movement (STIM) Program and Co-Director of the Movement Disorders Clinic. A graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School, Dr. Chou completed his neurology residency and movement disorders fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Chou cares for patients with all forms of movement disorders, using all available treatments, including medications, botulinum toxin and deep brain stimulation (DBS). His research is focused on improving the methods of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to more effectively treat patients with Parkinson disease and related disorders. Dr. Chou also conducts clinical trials on new medical therapeutic agents for movement disorders. A strong patient advocate, Dr. Chou serves on the Professional Advisory Board of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation, the Medical Advisory Board of the International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) and has published a book for patients and families, “Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson's, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.”
  Chou
     
Praveen Dayalu, M.D., Fellowship Director of the University of Michigan Movement Disorders Group, is an Assistant Professor of Neurology. After graduating from medical school at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, he completed neurology residency and a movement disorders fellowship at Michigan. He is a board certified neurologist whose major focus is the clinical management of movement disorders, including Parkinsonian disorders, multiple system atrophy, Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, dementia with lewy bodies, and dystonia. He is highly skilled in the use of botulinum toxin injections for the management of neurologic symptoms. His research is focused on understanding the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy through the use of positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging, ane clinical trial for Huntington disease. Dr. Dayalu is an outstanding and deeply committed medical educator  who directs the movement disorders fellowship, as well as training residents and medical students. Dr. Dayalu’s teaching excellence was recognized in 2010 as the recipient of the Neurology Department Teaching Award.
  Dayalu
     
Nico Bohnen, M.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Radiology and Neurology at the University of Michigan. He is also Director of the Movement Disorders Clinic at the Ann Arbor VA. Dr. Bohnen attended medical school and PhD training in neuropsychology in the Netherlands. He received residency training in neurology at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and fellowship training in nuclear medicine and movement disorders at the University of Michigan. Dr. Bohnen’s clinincal practice is focused on the care of veterans with Parkinson disease and related movement  and neurodegenerative conditions. His research interests include the use of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of neurodegenerative disorders and normal aging. His research is funded by grants from the NIH, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Michael J. Fox Foundation.
 
Bohnen
 


Kirk Frey, MD, Ph.D. is the David Kuhl Collegiate Professor of Radiology and Neurology, Co-Director of the Movement Disorders Clinic, and Director of the Division of Nuclear Medicine.  Dr. Frey received his MD and PhD (Neuroscience) at the University of Michigan. He did his Neurology residency and Nuclear Medicine Fellowship training at Michigan.  His clinical work in movement disorders principally involves training neurology residents in the Movement Disorders Clinic. His research interest centers upon understanding brain functional changes in Parkinson disease, other movement disorders and dementing disorders. He studies these changes with positron emission tomography.  Dr. Frey is a leading expert on the development of PET imaging for brain applications. He is the recipient of the Kuhl-Lassen Award and the Henry Wagner Lectureship from the Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

 
Frey
     
Vikas Kotagal, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology. He completed medical school at the University of Minnesota and Neurology residency at the University of Michigan. He trained as a fellow in movement disorders and neurodegenerative diseases at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kotagal is a board certified neurologist who cares for patients with Parkinson disease, atypical parkinsonian disorders, dementias, tremor, gait and balance conditions. He directs a specialized clinic for the evaluation and treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus. His primary research interests include understanding the role of cardiovascular risk factors and microvascular changes in Parkinson disease, aging, and other neurodegenerative diseases, which he investigates in human subjects using of a variety of state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods.
  Kotagal
   
Dan Leventhal, M.D., Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Neurology and Biomedical Engineering. He recieved his medical and doctoral training (in biomedical engineering) from Case Western Reserve University. He pursued residency training in neurology and fellowship subspecialty training in movement disorders at the University of Michigan. Dr. Leventhal cares for patients with all forms of movement disorders. He is a member of the “STIM” (Surgical Therapies Improving Movement) team that evaluates and treats patients with deep brain stimulation therapy. Dr. Leventhal’s research is focused on understanding the abnormalities of brain circuitry that are responsible for Parkinson disease and related movement disorders.
  Leventhal
   

Henry Paulson, M.D., Ph.D. is the Lucile Groff Professor of Neurology, Director of the Michigan Alzheimer Disease Center and co-Director of the University of Michigan “Fast Forward” Protein Folding Disease Initiative. Dr. Paulson received his medical degree and doctorate from Yale University. He then completed a neurology residency and neurogenetics/movement disorders fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Paulson's research and clinical interests concern the causes and treatment of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on hereditary ataxias, polyglutamine diseases and Alzheimer's disease. Using test tube, cell-based and animal models, he has contributed to advances in the understanding of various neurodegenerative diseases. Among his awards, Dr. Paulson is a Taubman Scholar, an Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar in Aging, a semifinalist for the W.M. Keck Foundation Young Scholars in Medical Research, and a recipient of the Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholar in Aging Award from the American Federation for Aging Research
  Paulson
   
Vikram Shakkottai, M.B.B.S., Ph.D.is an Assistant Professor of Neurology. Dr. Shakkottai received his medical degree from the Christian Medical College, Vellore, India and a Ph.D. in biological sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He received residency training in neurology at Washington University in Saint Louis and fellowship subspecialty training in movement disorders at the University of Michigan. Dr. Shakkottai cares for patients with all forms of movement disorders, but his clinical and research interests are focused on the cerebellar ataxias; he is Clincial Director of the Ataxia Program at the University of Michigan. Dr. Shakkottai’s research focuses on understanding the physiologic changes in the cerebellum that accompany cerebellar ataxia. He was awarded the the Leonard Berg award for research done as a neurology resident at Washington University.
  Shakkottai
   
Peter Todd, M.D., Ph.D. is the Bucky and Patti Harris professor of neurology in the University of Michigan Medical School and a staff physician at the Ann Arbor VAMC. Dr. Todd obtained his medical and doctoral degrees at the University of Wisconsin. He recieved residenc training in neurology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and a fellowship in movement disorders and neurogenetics at the University of Michigan. Dr. Todd is board certified in neurology with subspecialty training in movement disorders and neurogenetics. He sees patients with all types of movement disorders, but has special interests in patients with inherited movement disorders or ataxias. He serves as a co-director of the University of Michigan Ataxia Clinic. Dr. Todd also co-directs the multidisciplinary Fragile X Clinic at the University of Michigan and sees adult patients with all fragile X spectrum disorders. Dr. Todd’s research targets the mechanisms by which RNA and RNA processing contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, with a specific interest in fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), myotonic dystrophy, and C9orf72-associated ALS and FTD.
  Todd
     

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