RABIES VACCINE

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

1. What is rabies?

Typhoid (typhoid fever) is a serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella typhi.

Typhoid causes a high fever, weakness, stomach pains, headache, loss of appetite, and sometimes a rash. If it is not treated, it can kill up to 30% of people who get it.

Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others.

Generally, people get typhoid from contaminated food or water. Typhoid is not common in the U.S., and most U.S. citizens who get the disease get it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000.

Typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid.

2. Typhoid vaccines

There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine gotten as a shot, and the other is live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine which is taken orally (by mouth).

3. Who should get typhoid vaccine and when?

Routine typhoid vaccination is not recommended in the United States, but typhoid vaccine is recommended for: Either vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

4. Some people should not get typhoid vaccine or should wait

Ask you doctor or nurse for more information.

5. What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from either of the two typhoid vaccines are very rare.

6. What if there is a moderate or severe reaction?

What should I look for?

Any unusual condition, such as a high fever or behavior changes. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness.

What should I do?

7 How can I learn more?

• Ask your provider. They can give you the vaccine package insert or suggest other sources of information.
• Call your local or state health department.
• Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):