U-M Hepatology News

Follow us on Twitter @Michiganliver for the latest Michigan Hepatology news.


Do's and don'ts in the management of cirrhosis: A view from the 21st century

A research agenda for curing chronic hepatitis B virus infection

Noninvasive imaging biomarker assessment of liver fibrosis by elastography in NAFLD

Pharmacotherapy for NASH: Current and emerging

First patient enrolled in pivotal phase 3 FOCuS clinical trial evaluating WTX101 for the treatment of Wilson Disease

Dr. Anna Lok will receive 2018 European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) International Recognition Award


What Causes Liver Disease? 5 Myths Dispelled

Fat hormone linked to progression of fatty liver disease may hold key to new treatments

Michigan Medicine at The Liver Meeting – October 20–24, 2017

Despite Viability, 'Increased-Risk' Donor Organs a Tough Sell to Transplant Patients

Port Huron man to bike 1,465 miles for organ donor awareness

Robert Fontana, MD on Michigan hepatitis A outbreak: Get vaccinated

Impactful leaders celebrate Women’s History Month at Michigan Medicine

Dr. Anna Lok, President 2017, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases


Dr. Elizabeth Speliotes receives 2016 Dean's Award for Basic Science Research

Why baby boomers need a hepatitis C screening

How tranplants transform lives

Dr. Anna Lok receives AGA's 2016 William Beaumont Prize in Gastroenterology


WDIV-TV- Incredible story of how a patient saved his doctor's life

Pricey HCV drugs worth the cost

Dr. Anna Lok earns American Liver Foundation scientific achievement award

Helping doctors predict what's next for patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C

Largest ever genome-wide study strengthens genetic link to obesity

Low sodium levels increase liver transplant survival benefit in sickest patients


U-M raises awareness of hepatitis C


Renal risk index: A clinical tool to predict the risk of end-stage renal disease among liver transplant recipients

Poorer health for acetaminophen overdose survivors than other liver failure patients