Esophageal endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for
dysplastic or neoplastic Barrett's disease

 

What is EMR?

EMR is a procedure involving the use of an endoscope, which is a lighted, flexible tube about the thickness of your finger. The doctor will pass the tube through the mouth to the back of the throat into the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). During the EMR the doctor will inject a solution into the lining of the esophagus or stomach to raise a lesion and separate it from the deep muscle layer. After the lesion is raised for safety purposes, the doctor will remove the tissue for examination in the laboratory.

Prep Instructions

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Planning for the procedure


Following are your instructions for taking medicines and preparing for your procedure. Follow the instructions carefully to ensure a successful exam.


7 days before your EMR:

1 day before your EMR:

You may have your normal diet the day before the procedure.


Day of your EMR:

Stop eating all solid foods 8 hours before your procedure. Clear liquids are acceptable to drink.

 Allowed clear liquids

 Non-clear liquids Not allowed
  • Gatorade, Pedialyte, or Powerade

  • Coffee or tea (no milk or non-dairy creamer)

  • Carbonated and non-carbonated soft drinks

  • Kool-Aid or other fruit-flavored drinks

  • Apple juice, white cranberry or white grape juice

  • Jell-O, popsicles

  • Chicken, beef or vegetable broth

  • Red or purple items of any kind

  • alcohol

  • Milk or non-dairy creamers

  • Juice with pulp
  • Hard candy
  • Any liquid you cannot see through

2 hours before your procedure:


Bring a list of all of your current medicines with you, including any over-the-counter medicines.



Disclaimer: This document contains information and/or instructional materials developed by Michigan Medicine for the typical patient with your condition. It may include links to online content that was not created by Michigan Medicine and for which Michigan Medicine does not assume responsibility. It does not replace medical advice from your health care provider because your experience may differ from that of the typical patient. Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about this document, your condition or your treatment plan.

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Michigan Medicine • Medical Procedures Unit • Last revised May 2017